UA Handbook

Parent Handbook (FAQs)

GREETINGS, AND WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF URBAN ACADEMY!

We know we are a different kind of school from what you’ve experienced before, and we put this handbook together in consultation with several parents who brought to our attention some common areas of confusion.

(We would also suggest that parents check out our website at urbanacademy.org, since many of the same topics are addressed in greater detail there.)

We decided to use the Frequently Asked Questions format for most of it, since it’s clear and to the point. We can keep adding questions as they arise.

HERE WE GO!

WHAT IS URBAN’S GUIDING PHILOSOPHY?

A big question, with a really long answer which we will try to keep short. Urban teachers practice “inquiry” style education, which mostly means we emphasize depth over coverage, we run discussion-based classes, and, more than anything else, we believe students need to be exposed to multiple points of view so that they can develop their own ideas and arguments and support them using evidence.

We also believe that it’s important students are able to control their own education— high school is the age at which teenagers are becoming independent— which is why we build choice into so much of our curriculum. Students must first choose to come to Urban (it’s not a school the Department of Education can “send” students to, rather, there is an application process students must go through); students choose their classes (and we work as hard as we can to honor those choices); and within classes, students are given opportunities to choose what topics to study, through their choice of what questions are the most important to study.

Urban is truly a staff run school. Each week, the staff meets as a group and decides almost every issue of substance about how the school should operate, from larger organizational questions (like the schedule, for example) to smaller, more individual question (such as the appropriate response to student misbehavior).

WHAT ARE THE CLASSROOMS LIKE?

Most classes are between 12-25 students with one or two teachers. Classes are comprised of students of mixed ages and skill levels— so there will be 9th graders in the same room with 12th graders, some students with really strong skills in the discipline, others with weaker skills. (There are several reasons for mixing the grades, but we’ve found that age does not necessarily correlate with skills across subject areas, and the richer the mix of students, the more interesting the classrooms. Also, given the size of our school, if classes were segregated by age, there would be very few to choose from.)

Our students come from neighborhoods across New York City, and Urban is a truly integrated school— racially and socio-economically. All of our classes value student voice, and so our rooms are set up to facilitate discussions— either an oval for the full class, or in small groups. You will not find straight rows of chairs facing the board in any Urban classroom (unless students are taking a test). In the exit interviews we conduct with our graduating seniors, many remark that the classes at Urban were the first place they talked to people who were different from them, and that the discussions were far richer as a result of the diversity in the room.

Our weekly schedule may seem unfamiliar to students when they first join us, as some classes meet for three or four hour-long sessions, while others might meet for two two— hour blocks. In general, teachers decide what time length and frequency bests suits the type of material they expect to cover, and we build the classes around their preferences.

IF THE KIDS ARE MIXED AGES AND GRADES, HOW DO TEACHERS ASSESS THEM?

Students are graded based upon their individual progress in the class. Attendance and the quality of work students submit to the teacher are always components of the grade, as is the quality of the students’ participation in class. Teachers communicate expectations to students at the beginning of each class, and they make clear their expectations as the class continues through regular feedback, both in written and verbal form.

PARTICIPATION IS A PART OF THE GRADE? WHAT IF A CHILD IS REALLY SHY?

There is much more to participation than raising your hand and making a comment when called on, a fact we remind students of all the time. Being an attentive listener can be just as valuable at times. So can participating in smaller group activities or discussions, or bringing ideas to the teacher outside of class, and so on. We do think that participating in discussions is valuable for both the individual student (who learns to organize his/her thoughts through the process) as well as to the class (which benefits from the multiple perspectives brought to bear on a topic), and so we encourage all students to raise their hands and offer comments. But students who are not comfortable doing so are able to contribute in other ways, as well.

DO YOU HAVE AP CLASSES? COLLEGE CLASSES?

We do not have AP classes because teachers at Urban design their own classes; we refuse to accept canned curriculum handed down to us by anyone, including (especially) the College Board. We do have several classes that have been certified as “College Preparatory Classes” by the New York City Department of Education (and which the City considers the equivalent of AP classes). We also have students taking “College Now” classes at CUNY colleges (mostly Hunter), and each semester we have four spots in classes at Sarah Lawrence College.

We are committed to challenging all of our students in all of our classes, and we believe they are all college preparatory.

HOW ARE STUDENTS SELECTED TO TAKE COLLEGE NOW AND SARAH LAWRENCE CLASSES?

As a general rule, we reserve those classes for 11th and 12th graders at Urban. As with almost everything we do, students who are interested must take the initiative to attend an information meeting and express their interest. The staff then reviews what courses are available and which students have expressed interest. The staff recommends students based upon their track record of attendance and work habits at Urban Academy. (In addition, College Now courses require a minimum score on the PSATs or the ELA Regents.)

YOU SAID STUDENTS CHOOSE THEIR CLASSES. WHAT DOES THAT LOOK LIKE?

Before each semester begins, staff members submit their course descriptions (“blurbs”) for publication in a course catalog. Students receive the catalog as well as a one page “menu” of the courses in each period, which they then must rank according to preference before they return for registration. When they return, they meet with their “tutorial teacher” (aka their advisor), who discusses their selections and ensures that they have selected a varied program that covers the NYS distributional requirements and moves them forward to graduation.

Teachers design their own classes and create their own curriculum, often choosing to change the focus when student interest takes a different direction. We don’t have survey classes (such as 10th grade US History, covering Columbus to Reagan), but rather classes that emphasize depth— an American History class might cover the Civil War and Reconstruction, for example, or explore the first contact by comparing the Disney Pocahontas with the historical figure. Teachers create new classes regularly, but they also re-teach them in later semesters. Each department ensures that there is a an appropriate spread of classes for students to choose from.

WHAT IS “TUTORIAL,” AND WHO IS THE “TUTORIAL TEACHER”?

Tutorial is our version of homeroom— what some other schools call advisory. Each teacher in the school has 10-12 students for whom s/he is responsible in terms of academic monitoring. Students generally choose their tutorial teachers.

Tutorials meet three times a week— two fifty minute periods and one fifteen minute period. During the tutorials, students are usually doing homework (or seeking help from one of their classroom teachers) while their tutorial teacher checks in with them individually. The tutorial teacher is a good source of information on how your child is doing in her/his classes and where s/he is along the road to graduation.

Tutorial is crucial to our program— in ensuring that we are tracking student progress and in providing an opportunity for one-on-one meetings between teachers and students.

YOU MENTIONED NYS REQUIREMENTS— DOES URBAN’S PROGRAM ALIGN WITH THE STATE LEARNING STANDARDS?

Yes. Students at Urban are granted full Regents level diplomas, approved by New York State’s Board of Regents. We make sure that students have all the credits they need, distributed according to NYS rules and regulations.

HOW CAN THEY GET REGENTS DIPLOMAS IF THEY DON’T HAVE TO TAKE THE REGENTS EXAMS?

It’s a long story, but in brief, roughly 20 years ago, Urban Academy and about 25 other alternative schools in NYC demonstrated to the Board of Regents that our students were being admitted to college and succeeding in college at a rate higher than that of traditional students in NYC. We were granted a waiver from the Regents curriculum as long as we: 1) agreed to have students take and pass the English Language Arts exam and 2) used our performance based system of assessment (we call them proficiencies) to ensure that our students were ready to graduate from high school.

SO, WHAT ARE THE PROFICIENCIES?

You can read the full description of the proficiencies in our “Graduation Requirements” document, but, briefly, they are projects designed by each department (Math, Science, Literature, Social Studies, Creative Arts and Art Criticism) to demonstrate that students are able to do college-level work. Almost all of the projects come out of the work done in and for classes. Students take a great deal of pride in the final product, which makes sense— it has been their project and they’ve worked it up to a college level over several months.

ARE THERE PRE-REQUISITES BEFORE KIDS CAN START A PROFICIENCY?

Yes— two kinds. First, students must pass two classes (with a C- or better) in each of the disciplines. This is what most 9th and 10th graders are working on at Urban. Second, students must complete a smaller project within each discipline (like a science laboratory report in science, or an analytical paper in social studies). The project must meet a higher standard, as defined through revisions with the teacher of the class.

HOW DO KIDS KNOW THAT THEY ARE MAKING PROGRESS TOWARDS GRADUATION?

Their tutorial teacher meets with them several times during the semester to go over their progress. Using our in-house records, teachers and students can figure out what they’ve done and what remains.

HOW CAN PARENTS FIND OUT ABOUT THEIR CHILD’S PROGRESS?

Starting in 11th grade, all teachers fill out a “proficiency progress sheet” which is included with each set of comments that goes home (at mid-terms and at the end of each semester). Parents are also encouraged to communicate directly with their child and their child’s tutorial teacher.

WHAT IS THE MEANING OF “SENIOR STATUS”?

Because students are entering Urban at different points in their high school years, and because our classes are mixed grades, the only grade we define firmly is senior year, when students must begin the college application process. For obvious reasons, we don’t want students who are not prepared to graduate at the end of the year to begin applying to college.

We have a formula for what students must accomplish in order to be designated a senior and begin the application process. It’s too long to go over in this answer, but it is available on our website.

During the second semester of their junior year, students and their parents will be informed several times what they must accomplish by the end of the semester in order to receive “senior status.” A letter is sent home in June explaining whether the student has fullfilled the requirements to become a senior.

MY CHILD JUST BEGAN AT URBAN AND SAYS SHE IS IN “THE PROJECT”? WHAT IS THAT?

Each semester, Urban spends the first three weeks on an intensive course— students are in one class with the same group of students and teacher(s) for the whole day every day, studying one topic. In the fall, the entire school studies a single subject, with each project group studying sub-topics. (For example, this fall the school is looking at transportation, with one group studying the history and impact of the A train, one group studying the sociology of mass transit, one group looking at art in the subways, and so on.) In the spring, teachers design their own project group course topics, which are not connected to a school-wide theme.

Students are awarded a full academic credit for the project, in the discipline which the group studied.

WHY DO YOU HAVE THE PROJECT?

So many reasons. It allows us to make full use of the City and its resources, since the full day schedule makes taking trips easy. It mixes the students into different groupings and allows them to make new friends and get to know students they otherwise might not talk to. It introduces new students to the academic expectations and philosophy at Urban through a single course (rather than the six of the regular semester). It allows teachers to try experiment with new topics (we are a laboratory school, and many teachers have turned their project experiences into full semester courses). It allows us to work collaboratively as a staff, particularly in the fall when we define the topic and build assignments and activities together.

HOW DOES COMMUNITY SERVICE WORK AT URBAN ACADEMY?

Every Wednesday from 12:15-3:15, students are expected to perform work for the larger community. Some students work in the building (in the library, for example, or helping teachers of younger kids in the Ella Baker school), but most leave and work in organizations around the City. We have over 100 different placements at any given time— in public schools, libraries, animal shelters, neighborhood groups. Some students bring placements to us— a favorite elementary school teacher wants an assistant in her classroom, say, or their church runs a soup kitchen that needs workers. But many students are assigned a placement based upon their interests, which are discerned through a survey at the beginning of the semester. (If you know of a placement that you think would work for your child or others, Cathy and Caitlin, the community service coordinators, would love to hear from you!)

We believe this work is valuable for helping students attain work-related skills; some skills vary depending on the placements, of course, but dealing with co-workers, arriving on time, behaving in a manner appropriate to the work-place are skills all students develop in their placements. Students also build a resume through their placements, and many obtain recommendations for future endeavors from supervisors (who fill out evaluations at the end of each semester which are included with final comments).

Each semester, students reflect on their experiences in small group discussions, and some present the work they have done to their tutorial (and occasionally the whole school).

Mostly, however, we believe there is value in serving the community, and we believe most students come to appreciate that over their time at Urban.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PARENTS AT URBAN?

A very good question, and one with as many answers as there are students and parents. Just as we work with students as individuals, we work with their parents on an individual basis, as well.

We value parent/guardian input and questions, and are happy to speak with you about your concerns or suggestions. As a small staff with limited office support, we want our teachers to spend their time on teaching and curriculum, and in direct work with our students. We encourage students to speak with us directly to address their issues/needs, but also want to collaborate with parents/guardians to meet the educational needs of your children.

We do sometimes call on parents to support Urban Academy when there is an external situation that requires action.

HOW DO YOU COMMUNICATE WITH PARENTS?

We are happy to take phone calls and to provide status updates. We do not use an on-line platform like Jupiter or JumpRope, mostly because it requires a great deal of data-entry time from teachers that is much better spent preparing for class or providing feedback on written work. But tutorial teachers are available to provide updates about how students are doing in classes, and Becky and Adam can be reached quickly and easily. Many parents call and/or email us and we are happy to take the calls and/or reply, and to connect parents with teachers.

We do try to keep the calendar on our website up to date, and we send out email reminders of important upcoming events and dates. (Please be sure we have the email address you check regularly.)

We have a Parent-Teacher night scheduled each semester— in November and April and we encourage parents to attend. You’ll have a chance to meet your child’s teachers and have what we think is a more in depth (if time-limited) chance to talk about the class and your child’s performance in it than the more typical frantic three minute rotations in most schools.

IS THERE A PARENT ASSOCIATION?

Yes, but because the school is so small and our population is more transient (so many students are at the school for 2 or 3 years, instead of the usual 4), typical PA functions (like fundraising) are harder. We have tried the usual PA fundraisers in the past— auctions, bake sales, etc., but we have found that we don’t raise as much money as we would like given the hours spent.

Consequently, the PA is most useful for helping parents understand the way Urban works— and we devote most of the meetings to explaining one aspect or another of our program (for example, we will explain the requirements of a particular proficiency).

DO WE GET WRITTEN REPORTS?

Mid-term reports (without grades) and final reports (with grades) are sent home each semester. Our reports are written in narrative form, and reflect the style of the teacher writing them. Most will open with a section on what your child is doing well and then move on to what we expect them to work on in the future. We hope these reports give you a sense of the class in question, as well as how your child is progressing, in a way that is more specific than the letter/number grades sent home in larger high schools. Final comments, at the end of the semester, include a narrative description of the second half of the term, and a final (letter) grade for the class.

In addition, interim reports (about mid-way between mid-terms and the end of the semester) provide a snapshot of whether your child has made a dramatic change (for better or worse) since mid-term comments. Parents who want more information (beyond these 6 reports) should call their child’s tutorial teacher or Becky and/or Adam.

HOW DOES COLLEGE COUNSELING HAPPEN AT URBAN?

We would argue that Urban Academy has the best college counselors in the City, and they are remarkably successful at helping each student find the best fit— academically and financially.

We start the process as soon as students arrive at Urban, with semesterly visits to colleges in the tri-state area (and sometimes beyond— we have taken students on longer trips to places like Howard University, College of the Atlantic, Temple, Hampshire, Goucher, and more).

In the second half of junior year, students begin formal college counseling with the college advisors (Rachel W, Rachel B and Kevin on the academic counseling; Andrea on the financial aid counseling), looking at different types of schools, calculating their GPAs, figuring out whether to take the SATs, ACTs, etc. In the fall of senior year, students meet with the advisors on a weekly basis. Parents come in for a meeting, as well, to discuss possibilities.

We do not offer SAT/ACT prep classes, for several reasons. First, we don’t believe test-preparation fits with our pedagogy or our mission. Second, when we have paid to bring in a group like the Princeton Review for an afterschool class, very few students attended after the second week. Third, if students are devoting after-school hours to test prep, we become concerned that they may not be spending as much time on homework for our classes, which is counterproductive, since success in our classes is more important in getting into college than test scores. (And for that reason, we advise families thinking of signing their children up for test-prep classes outside of school to do that during the summer.)

Our college advisors write impressive counselor recommendations, and our teachers write effective letters as well. (A benefit of the small school size is that teachers know students quite well, and that comes through in our recommendations.) The counselors work with students to “package” them well for the colleges they have chosen. Seniors write their personal essays either in the essay class designed for that purpose or with the assistance of a teacher who has been assigned to that role.

The list of schools that accepted our students is available here. We are proud of the list.

HOW DOES URBAN ADDRESS SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL ISSUES?

In many different ways. Many classes have units on gender and health issues, and we have a guidance counselor who is available to talk to students who are interested in counseling. In addition, the Mt. Sinai health clinic downstairs has a social worker who will schedule regular (or as needed) sessions with students, and a health educator who will offer workshops on teen health issues.

Interpersonal ethics and responsibilities pervade our school. From the explicit cardinal rule of Urban (“No Personal Attacks”) to the close relationships teachers and students build, to the conflict counseling that teachers and students do on a daily basis, the principal message of Urban Academy is that we are a community that respects each individual as an individual, that humiliation is unacceptable, and that by listening and talking to people who are different we learn better and become better people.

HOW DOES URBAN DEAL WITH STUDENTS WHO ARE LATE OR ABSENT?

A few points to make here. First, students should miss as little school as possible. If you are scheduling medical or other appointments in advance, please make them during after-school hours, or on days when there is no school (holidays, election days, etc.). (Clearly, if your child is sick, you take whatever appointment you can get.)

Second, If your child is going to be out, either because of an unavoidable appointment or because s/he is ill, please call or email to let us know. Every afternoon, we send an email to parents of students who did not appear in the school (so it’s important that we have an email address that you check regularly).

Lastly, while missing a day or two here or there is not a big problem, students who are late or absent too frequently will be unable to receive credit for their classes (a student who is coming 30 minutes late to a first period class that meets for 60 minutes is missing 50% of the class!). So much of the work of the class takes place in the classroom during the discussions that occur there. It is central to our pedagogy that class discussions are where students develop their ideas and deepen their understanding of the material. Consequently, students who miss class discussion too often are not actually doing the work of the class, and will be unable to demonstrate mastery of the material (even if they do the homework).

Manual Para Padres
(Preguntas Más Frecuentes)

¡SALUDOS, Y BIENVENIDOS AL MUNDO DE URBAN ACADEMY!

Sabemos que somos una escuela diferente a los que usted normalmente conoce, por eso compusimos éste manual con el fin de aclarar preguntas en áreas comunes que varios padres han traído a nuestra atención.

(También sugerimos que visite nuestro sitio web en urbanacademy.org, ya que allí, usted se puede dar cuenta del tipo de escuela que somos, a través de fotografías y otros medios visuales).

Decidimos utilizar el formato de “Preguntas Más Frecuentes” para la mayoría, ya que es un formato claro y al punto. Vamos a seguir agregando preguntas a medida que surjan.

¡AQUÍ VAMOS!

¿CUÁL ES LA FILOSOFÍA DE URBAN?

Una gran pregunta, con una respuesta realmente larga, la cual intentaremos acortar. Los maestros en Urban Academy practican la educación basada en “investigación”, que en su mayoría quiere decir que le damos prioridad a la profundidad de tema más que a cobertura. Por esa razón, impartimos clases basadas en discusiones; nuestra creencia es que los estudiantes deben estar expuestos a múltiples puntos de vista e ideas, de modo que ellos puedan desarrollar sus propias ideas y argumentos, y concretarlos utilizando evidencia.

También creemos que es importante que los estudiantes puedan tener el control sobre su propia educación; la escuela secundaria es la edad en que los adolescentes se vuelven independientes, por lo que incorporamos muchas opciones en nuestro currículum. Los estudiantes primero deben elegir Urban (no es una escuela a la que el Departamento de Educación puede "enviar" estudiantes, sino que hay un proceso de aplicación por la que los estudiantes deben pasar); los estudiantes eligen sus clases (y hacemos lo mejor que podemos para honorar sus elecciones); y dentro de las clases, los estudiantes tienen la oportunidad de elegir qué temas estudiar, y basado en su elección, qué preguntas son las más importantes para estudiar.

Urban es verdaderamente una escuela dirigida por el personal. Cada semana, el personal se reúne en grupo y decide sobre las cuestiones de cómo la escuela debería funcionar, desde preguntas organizativas más amplias (como el horario, por ejemplo) a preguntas más pequeñas e individuales (como la respuesta adecuada a la mala conducta de algún estudiantes).

¿CÓMO SON LAS AULAS DE CLASES?

La mayoría de las clases son entre 12 a 25 estudiantes con uno o dos profesores. Las clases están compuestas por estudiantes de mixtas edades y niveles de habilidad, por lo que habrán estudiantes de 9º grado en la misma clase con estudiantes de 12º grado, algunos estudiantes con habilidades y familiaridad muy amplias en la disciplina, y otros principiantes o intermedia. (Hay varias razones para mezclar a los estudiantes, pero nos hemos dado cuenta que la edad no necesariamente se relaciona con la habilidad del estudiante en las materias, y cuanto más es la mezcla de estudiantes, más interesantes son las clases. Además, dado el tamaño de nuestra escuela, si las clases estuvieran organizadas por edad, habrían muy pocas para elegir.)

Nuestros estudiantes provienen de vecindarios de toda la ciudad de Nueva York, y Urban es una escuela verdaderamente integrada, tanto en aspecto racial y socioeconómica. Todas nuestras clases valoran la voz y el aporte de los estudiantes, por lo que nuestros salones de clases están configuradas para facilitar discusiones, ya sea un óvalo donde toda la clase participa o en grupos pequeños. No se encuentran filas de sillas frente dirigidas a la pizarra en ningún aula de clase (a menos que los estudiantes estén tomando un examen). En las entrevistas que realizamos con nuestros egresantes, muchos comentan que las clases en Urban fueron donde hablaron con personas que eran diferentes a ellos, y que las discusiones fueron mucho más interesantes debido a la diversidad en las aulas.

Nuestro horario semanal puede parecer desconocido para los estudiantes cuando se unen a nosotros por primera vez, ya que algunas clases se reúnen durante sesiones de tres o cuatro horas, mientras que otras pueden reunirse durante dos bloques de dos horas. En general, los maestros deciden qué tiempo y frecuencia se adaptan mejor al tipo de material que esperan cubrir, y construimos las clases basadas en sus preferencias.

SI LOS ESTUDIANTES TIENEN EDADES Y GRADOS MEZCLADOS ¿CÓMO SON EVALUADOS POR LOS MAESTROS?

Los estudiantes son calificados en base a su progreso individual en la clase. La asistencia y la calidad del trabajo que los estudiantes envían al maestro son siempre componentes de la evaluación, al igual que la calidad de participación en clase. Al comienzo de cada clase, los maestros dejan al conocimiento de los alumnos las expectativas, y las dejan claras a medida que la clase continúa con comentarios regulares, tanto en forma escrita como verbal.

¿LA PARTICIPACIÓN ES UNA PARTE DEL GRADO? ¿QUÉ PASA SI UN NIÑO ES MUY TÍMIDO?

La participación es mucho más que levantar la mano y hacer un comentario cuando es solicitada, y esto es un hecho que recordamos a los alumnos todo el tiempo.Ser un oyente atento puede ser igual de valioso a veces. Así uno puede participar en actividades o discusiones de grupos más pequeños, o comunicar ideas al maestro fuera de la clase, etc. Creemos que participar en las discusiones es valioso tanto para el estudiante individual (que aprende a organizar sus ideas y pensamientos por medio del proceso) como para la clase (que se beneficia de las múltiples perspectivas que son aportadas en un tema), y así animamos a todos los estudiantes a levantar sus manos y ofrecer comentarios. Pero los estudiantes que no se sienten cómodos al hacerlo también pueden contribuir de otras maneras.

¿TIENEN CLASES AP? CLASES UNIVERSITARIAS?

No tenemos clases de AP porque los maestros de Urban diseñan sus propias clases; nos negamos a aceptar el currículum enlatado que nos entrega cualquiera, incluido (especialmente) por College Board. Tenemos varias clases que han sido certificadas como "Clases Preparatorias Para La Universidad" por el Departamento de Educación de la Ciudad de Nueva York (los cuales la Ciudad los considera equivalente a las clases AP). También tenemos estudiantes que toman clases de "College Now" en las universidades de CUNY (en su mayoría Hunter), y cada semestre tenemos cuatro cupos en las clases en Sarah Lawrence College.

Estamos comprometidos a desafiar a todos nuestros estudiantes en todas nuestras clases, los cuales creemos que todos son preparatorios para la universidad.

¿CÓMO SE SELECCIONAN LOS ESTUDIANTES PARA TOMAR CLASES DE COLLEGE NOW Y CLASES EN SARAH LAWRENCE?

Como regla general, reservamos esas clases para los estudiantes de 11º y 12º grado. Al igual que con casi todo lo que hacemos, los estudiantes interesados deben tomar la iniciativa para asistir a una reunión informativa y expresar su interés. El personal luego revisa qué cursos están disponibles y quienes de los estudiantes han expresado interés. El personal recomienda a los estudiantes, basándose en su historial de asistencia y hábitos de trabajo en Urban Academy.(Además, los cursos de College Now requieren una puntuación mínima en los PSAT o en los Regentes de ELA).

DICEN QUE LOS ESTUDIANTES ELIGEN SUS CLASES ¿CÓMO ES ESO?

Al principio de cada semestre, los miembros del personal envían las descripciones de los cursos para ser publicados en un catálogo de cursos. Los estudiantes reciben el catálogo, y también un "menú" de los cursos en cada período. Los cuales, antes de regresar para registrarse, ellos clasifican de acuerdo con sus preferencias. Y cuando regresan, se reúnen con su “maestro de tutoría” (también conocido como su asesor), quien analiza sus selecciones y se asegura de que el estudiante haya seleccionado un programa variado y que cumple con los requisitos del estado de NY y que contribuya a su progreso para graduarse.

Los maestros diseñan sus propias clases y crean su propio plan de estudios, a menudo eligiendo cambiar el enfoque cuando el interés del estudiante toma una dirección diferente. No tenemos clases de encuesta (como Historia de los Estados Unidos en el décimo grado, que cubren desde Cristóbal Colón a la presidencia de Reagan), sino clases que enfatizan la profundidad de un tema. Una clase de Historia de los Estados Unidos podría cubrir la “Guerra Civil” y la “Reconstrucción”, por ejemplo, o explorar el primer contacto al comparar “Las Pocahontas de Disney” con una figura histórica. Los maestros crean nuevas clases con regularidad, pero también las vuelven a enseñar en los semestres posteriores. Cada departamento se asegura de que haya una variedad apropiada de clases de las que los estudiantes puedan elegir.

¿QUÉ ES "TUTORÍA” Y QUIÉN ES EL "MAESTRO TUTOR”?

Tutoría es nuestra versión de lo que otras escuelas les llaman “Homeroom”o “Advisory (Asesoría)”. Cada maestro de la escuela tiene entre 10 y 12 estudiantes de los cuales es responsable en términos de supervisión académica. Los estudiantes generalmente eligen sus maestros de tutoría.

En las tutorías los estudiantes se reúnen tres veces por semana: dos períodos de cincuenta minutos y un período de quince minutos. Durante las tutorías, los estudiantes generalmente hacen la tarea, o buscan ayuda de uno de sus maestros de clase, mientras que el maestro de tutoría conduce una plática individual con los estudiantes.El maestro tutor es un buen recurso de información sobre cómo se está desempeñando su hijo en sus clases y dónde se encuentra en su progreso con respecto a su graduación.

Tutoría es crucial para nuestro programa, tanto para asegurar de que estamos rastreando el progreso del estudiante, como para brindar una oportunidad a reuniones individuales entre maestros y estudiantes.

MENCIONARON SOBRE LOS REQUISITOS DEL ESTADO DE NY: ¿EL PROGRAMA DE URBAN SE ALINEA CON LAS NORMAS ESTATALES DE APRENDIZAJE?

Sí. A los estudiantes de Urban se les otorgan diplomas completos de nivel Regents, aprobados por la Junta de Regentes del Estado de Nueva York. Nos aseguramos de que los estudiantes tengan todos los créditos que necesitan, distribuidos de acuerdo con las normas y regulaciones del Estado de NY.

¿CÓMO PUEDEN OBTENER DIPLOMAS DE NIVEL REGENTS SI NO TIENEN QUE TOMAR LOS EXÁMENES DE LOS REGENTES?

Es una larga historia, pero en resumen, hace aproximadamente 20 años, Urban Academy y otras 25 escuelas alternativas en Nueva York demostraron a la Junta de Regentes que nuestros estudiantes estaban ingresando y teniendo éxito en la universidad a un ritmo mayor que el de los estudiantes tradicionales en Nueva York. Se nos otorgó una exención del plan de estudios Regents, siempre y cuando: 1) Acordamos que los estudiantes tomen y aprueben el examen de Artes del Lenguaje en Inglés y 2) usemos nuestro sistema de evaluación basado en el sistema de evaluación (a los que nosotros llamamos proficiencias) para asegurar de que nuestros estudiantes estén listo para graduarse de la secundaria.

ENTONCES, ¿CUÁLES SON LAS PROFICIENCIAS?

Puede leer la descripción completa de las proficiencias en nuestro documento “Graduation Requirements”, pero, brevemente, son proyectos diseñados por cada departamento (Matemáticas, Ciencias, Literatura, Estudios Sociales, Artes Creativas y Crítica de Arte) para demostrar que los estudiantes son capacitados para hacer trabajos de nivel universitario. Casi todos los proyectos surgen del trabajo realizado en y para las clases. Los estudiantes se enorgullecen del producto final, lo cual tiene sentido: ha sido su proyecto y lo han trabajado en ello a un nivel universitario durante meses.

¿HAY PRERREQUISITOS ANTES DE QUE LOS ESTUDIANTES PUEDEN COMENZAR UNA PROFICIENCIA?

Sí, dos tipos. Primero, los estudiantes deben aprobar dos clases (con una C- o mejor) en cada una de las disciplinas. Esto es en lo que la mayoría de los alumnos de grado 9º y 10º trabajan. Segundo, los estudiantes deben completar un proyecto más pequeño dentro de cada disciplina (como un informe de laboratorio para ciencias o un documento analítico en estudios sociales). El proyecto debe cumplir con un estándar más alto, como se ha definido por medio de las revisiones con el maestro de esa clase.

¿CÓMO SABEN LOS ESTUDIANTES QUE ESTÁN HACIENDO PROGRESOS HACIA SU GRADUACIÓN?

Su maestro tutor se reúne con ellos varias veces durante el semestre para revisar su progreso. Usando nuestros registros internos, los maestros y los estudiantes pueden darse cuenta de lo que han hecho y lo que aún queda.

¿CÓMO PUEDEN LOS PADRES INFORMARSE DEL PROGRESO DE SU HIJO?

Comenzando en el 11º grado, todos los maestros llenan una hoja de “progreso de proficiencia” que se incluye con cada conjunto de comentarios que se envía a casa (a mitad de período y al final de cada semestre). También se anima a los padres a comunicarse directamente con sus hijos y con el maestro tutor de sus hijos.

¿CUÁL ES EL SIGNIFICADO DE "SENIOR STATUS"?

Debido a que los estudiantes están ingresando a Urban en diferentes puntos en sus años de escuela secundaria, y porque nuestras clases son de grados mixtos, el único grado que definimos firmemente es el último año (12°), cuando los estudiantes deben comenzar el proceso de aplicaciones para la universidad. Por razones obvias, no queremos que los estudiantes que no están preparados para graduarse al final del año comiencen a inscribirse en la universidad también.

Tenemos una fórmula de lo que los estudiantes deben lograr para ser designados como “senior” (12°) y poder comenzar sus aplicaciones. Es demasiado largo para explicar esta respuesta, pero está disponible en nuestro sitio web.

Durante el segundo semestre de su año de “junior” (11°), los estudiantes y sus padres serán informados varias veces de lo que deben lograr al final del semestre para recibir el "estado senior". En Junio se enviará una carta a casa explicando si el estudiante ha cumplido con los requisitos para convertirse en un senior.

MI HIJO ACABA DE EMPEZAR EN URBAN Y DICE QUE ESTÁ EN “EL PROYECTO”? ¿QUÉ ES ESO?

Cada semestre, Urban dedica las primeras tres semanas en un curso intensivo: los estudiantes estarán en una clase con el mismo grupo de estudiantes y profesor(es) durante todo el día, estudiando un tema. En el otoño, toda la escuela estudia una sola materia, y cada grupo de proyecto estudia los subtemas. (Por ejemplo, este otoño, la escuela está estudiando a los animales, con un grupo estudiando la coexistencia de animales y humanos, un grupo estudiando la ética de zoológicos, etc.). Pero en la primavera, los maestros diseñan sus propios grupos con temas de cursos, esta vez no están conectados a un solo tema.

Los estudiantes reciben un crédito académico completo para el proyecto, en la disciplina que el grupo estudió.

¿POR QUÉ TIENEN EL PROYECTO?

Tantas razones. Nos permite hacer un uso completo de la Ciudad y sus recursos, ya que el horario de todo el día facilita los viajes. Esto contribuye a la mezcla de los estudiantes en diferentes grupos y les permite hacer nuevos amigos y conocer a los estudiantes con los que de otra forma no podrían hablar. Presenta a los nuevos estudiantes las expectativas académicas y la filosofía de Urban Academy a través de un solo curso (en lugar de los seis del semestre regular). Les permite a los maestros experimentar nuevos temas (somos una escuela de laboratorio y muchos maestros han convertido sus experiencias de proyectos en cursos semestrales completos). Nos permite trabajar en colaboración como personal, especialmente en el otoño cuando definimos el tema y creamos tareas y actividades juntos.

¿CÓMO FUNCIONA EL SERVICIO COMUNITARIO EN URBAN ACADEMY?

Todos los miércoles de 12:15 a 3:15, se espera que los estudiantes realicen trabajos para la comunidad en general. Algunos estudiantes trabajan en el edificio (en la biblioteca, por ejemplo, o ayudando a maestros de niños más pequeños en la escuela de Ella Baker), pero la mayoría se va y trabaja en organizaciones de la ciudad. Tenemos más de 100 ubicaciones diferentes en cualquier dado momento: en escuelas públicas, bibliotecas, refugios para animales, grupos de vecinos. Algunos estudiantes nos proponen ubicaciones: un maestro de escuela primaria favorito que quiere un asistente en su salón de clases, por ejemplo, o su iglesia que dirige un comedor social y necesita trabajadores. Pero a muchos estudiantes se les asigna una ubicación basada en sus intereses, los cuales se disciernen a través de una encuesta al comienzo del semestre. (Si conoce una ubicación que cree que funcionaría para su hijo o para otras personas, a Cathy y Caitlin, las coordinadoras de servicios comunitarios, les encantaría que usted les informe al respecto).

Creemos que realizar servicios comunitarios es valioso y que eso puede ayudar a los estudiantes adquirir habilidades relacionadas con un trabajo; algunas habilidades varían dependiendo de las ubicaciones, por supuesto, pero tratar con compañeros de trabajo, llegar a tiempo, comportarse de una manera apropiada para el lugar de trabajo son habilidades que todos los estudiantes desarrollan en sus ubicaciones. Los estudiantes también construyen un currículum vitae basado en sus servicios, y muchos obtienen recomendaciones para futuros usos de los supervisores (quienes completan las evaluaciones al final de cada semestre, los cuales se incluyen con los comentarios finales).

Cada semestre, los alumnos reflexionan sobre sus experiencias en pequeños grupos de discusión, y algunos presentan el trabajo que han realizado en su tutoría (y ocasionalmente en toda la escuela).

Sin embargo, sobre todo, creemos que es valioso servir a la comunidad, y creemos que la mayoría de los estudiantes lo aprecian durante su estadía en Urban.

¿CUÁL ES EL PAPEL DE LOS PADRES EN URBAN?

Una muy buena pregunta, y una con tantas respuestas como estudiantes y padres. Al igual que trabajamos con los estudiantes como individuos, también trabajamos con sus padres de forma individual.

Valoramos los comentarios y las preguntas de los padres/encargados y nos da gusto hablar con usted sobre sus inquietudes o sugerencias. Como un personal pequeño y con apoyo de oficina limitado, queremos que nuestros maestros dediquen su tiempo a la enseñanza y el currículo, y al trabajo directo con nuestros estudiantes. Animamos a los estudiantes a hablar con nosotros directamente para abordar sus problemas/necesidades, pero también queremos colaborar con los padres/encargados para satisfacer las necesidades educativas de sus hijos.

Algunas veces hacemos un llamado a los padres para que apoyen a Urban Academy cuando hay una situación externa la cual requiere acción.

¿CÓMO SE COMUNICAN CON LOS PADRES?

Nos da gusto recibir llamadas telefónicas y de proporcionar reportajes. No utilizamos una plataforma en línea como Jupiter o JumpRope, principalmente porque requiere una gran cantidad de tiempo para ingresar datos por parte de los maestros, lo cual es es mejor ser invertido en la preparación de la clase o en proporcionar comentarios sobre el trabajo en forma escrita. Sin embargo, los maestros tutores están disponibles para proporcionar actualizaciones sobre cómo se están desempeñando los estudiantes en las clases, y se puede contactar a Becky y Adam de manera rápida y fácil. Muchos padres nos llaman y/o envíanos un correo electrónico y estamos encantados de atender las llamadas y/o responder, y de conectar a los padres con los maestros.

Intentamos mantener el calendario actualizado en nuestro sitio web y enviamos recordatorios por correos electrónicos sobre próximos eventos y fechas importantes. (Asegúrese de que tenemos la dirección de correo electrónico que revisa de forma regular).

Tenemos una noche de padres y maestros programada para cada semestre, en Noviembre y Abril, y animamos a los padres a asistir. Tendrá la oportunidad de conocer a los maestros de su hijo y tendrá lo que creemos que es una oportunidad más profunda (aunque limitada) para hablar sobre la clase y el progreso de su hijo en ella, a comparación con las rotaciones frenéticas de tres minutos más típicas en la mayoría de las escuelas.

¿HAY UNA ASOCIACIÓN DE PADRES?

Sí, pero debido a que la escuela es muy pequeña y nuestra población es más transitoria (muchos estudiantes están en la escuela por 2 o 3 años, en lugar de los 4 habituales), las funciones típicas de PA (como la recaudación de fondos) son más difíciles. En el pasado, hemos intentado las recaudaciones de fondos habituales de PA: subastas, ventas de pasteles, etc., pero nos hemos dado cuenta que no recaudamos tanto dinero como nos gustaría, dadas a las horas dedicadas.

En consecuencia, PA es más útil para ayudar a los padres a entender la forma en que Urban trabaja, y dedicamos la mayoría de las reuniones a explicar un aspecto u otro de nuestro programa (por ejemplo, explicaremos los requisitos de una proficiencia en particular).

¿CÓMO PODEMOS RECIBIR REPORTES ESCRITOS?

Los informes de medio término (sin calificaciones) y los informes finales (con calificaciones) se envían a casa cada semestre. Nuestros informes están escritos en forma narrativa y reflejan el estilo del maestro quien las escribe. La mayoría comienza con una sección sobre lo que su hijo está haciendo bien y luego continuará con lo que esperamos que trabaje en el futuro. Esperamos que estos informes le den una idea de la clase en cuestión, así como también de cómo su hijo está progresando, de una manera más específica que las calificaciones con letras y números enviadas a casa en escuelas secundarias más grandes. Los comentarios finales, al final del semestre, incluyen una descripción narrativa de la segunda mitad del término y una calificación final (carta) para la clase.

Además, los informes provisionales (a mitad de camino entre la mitad de los períodos y el final del semestre) proporcionan un resumen instantáneo sobre si su hijo ha realizado un cambio dramático (para bien o para mal) desde los comentarios a medio plazo. Los padres que desean más información (más allá de estos 6 informes) deben llamar al maestro o la maestra de tutoría de su hijo o a Becky y/o Adam.

¿CÓMO SUCEDE LA CONSEJERÍA UNIVERSITARIA EN URBAN?

Podemos argumentar que Urban Academy tiene los mejores consejeros universitarios en la ciudad, y tienen un éxito notable en ayudar a cada estudiante a encontrar la mejor opción académica y financiera.

Comenzamos el proceso tan pronto como los estudiantes llegan a Urban, con visitas semestrales a universidades en el área de los tres condados (y, a veces, más allá; hemos llevado a los estudiantes a viajes a lugares más largos como la Universidad de Howard, College del Atlantic, Temple, Hampshire, Goucher, y más).

En la segunda mitad del año de “junior”, los estudiantes comienzan la asesoría universitaria formal con los asesores universitarios (Rachel W, Rachel B y Kevin sobre la asesoría académica; Andrea sobre la asesoría de ayuda financiera), observan diferentes tipos de escuelas, calculan sus GPA, determinan si deben tomar los exámenes SAT, ACT, etc. En el otoño del último año (12°), los estudiantes se reúnen con los asesores semanalmente. Los padres también asisten a una reunión para discutir sobre las posibilidades.

No ofrecemos clases de preparación para SAT/ACT, por varias razones. Primero, no creemos que la preparación para los exámenes se ajuste a nuestra pedagogía o nuestra misión. Segundo, cuando hemos pagado para traer un grupo conocido como Princeton Review para una clase después de clases regulares, muy pocos estudiantes asistieron después de la segunda semana. Tercero, si los estudiantes dedican horas después de la escuela a los exámenes de preparación, nos preocupa que no pasen tanto tiempo en la tarea para nuestras clases, lo cual es contraproducente, ya que el éxito en nuestras clases es más importante para ingresar a la universidad que las puntuaciones de exámenes. (Y por esa razón, aconsejamos a las familias que consideran inscribir a sus hijos en clases de preparación para exámenes fuera de la escuela para que lo hagan durante el verano).

Nuestros asesores universitarios escriben impresionantes recomendaciones de consejeros, y nuestros maestros también escriben cartas efectivas. (Un beneficio del pequeño tamaño de la escuela es que los maestros conocen a los estudiantes bastante bien, y eso se refleja en nuestras recomendaciones). Los consejeros trabajan con los estudiantes para capacitarlos bien para las universidades que vayan a elegir. Los seniors escriben sus ensayos en la clase de ensayo diseñada para ese propósito o con la ayuda de un maestro que ha sido asignado a ese rol.

La lista de escuelas que aceptaron a nuestros estudiantes está disponible aquí. Estamos orgullosos de la lista.

¿CÓMO TRATAN CON PROBLEMAS SOCIALES Y EMOCIONALES?

De varias maneras. Muchas clases tienen unidades sobre temas de género y salud, y tenemos un consejero que está disponible para hablar con los estudiantes que estén interesados en la consejería. Además, la clínica de salud Mt. Sinai en la planta baja hay un trabajador social que programa sesiones regulares (o según sea necesario) con los estudiantes, y un educador de salud que ofrecerá talleres sobre temas relacionados con la salud de los adolescentes.

Ética interpersonal y responsabilidades impregnan nuestra escuela. Desde la regla cardinal explícita de Urban (“Sin Ataques Personales") hasta las relaciones cercanas que los maestros y los estudiantes construyen, y la asesoría sobre conflictos que los maestros y los estudiantes realizan a diario, el mensaje principal de Urban Academy es que somos una comunidad que respeta a cada individuo como individuo, que la humillación es inaceptable y que al escuchar y hablar con personas diferentes aprendemos mejor y nos convertimos en mejores personas.

¿CÓMO SON TRATADOS LOS ESTUDIANTES QUE LLEGAN TARDE O SON AUSENTES?

Algunos puntos para hacer aquí. Primero, los estudiantes deben faltar a la escuela lo poco posible. Si tengan citas médicas programadas o de otro tipo por adelantado, hágalas durante el horario de after-school o en los días en que no haya clases (días festivos, días de elecciones, etc.). (Claramente, si su hijo está enfermo, puede acudir a cualquier cita que pueda conseguir).

Segundo, si su hijo va a salir, ya sea debido a una cita inevitable o porque está enfermo, llame o envíe un correo electrónico para informarnos. Todas las tardes, enviamos un correo electrónico a los padres de los estudiantes que no aparecieron en la escuela (por lo que es importante que tengamos una dirección de correo electrónico que verifique regularmente).

Por último, aunque falte uno o dos días por aquí o allá, no es un gran problema. Pero los estudiantes que llegan tarde o están ausentes con demasiada frecuencia no podrán recibir crédito por sus clases (un estudiante que llega 30 minutos tarde a una clase del primer período que es de 60 minutos, ¡falta el 50% de la clase!). Gran parte del trabajo toma lugar en las clases durante las discusiones que ocurren allí. Es fundamental para nuestra pedagogía que las discusiones en clase sean donde los estudiantes desarrollan sus ideas y profundizan su comprensión del material. Consecuentemente, los estudiantes que pierden la discusión en clase con demasiada frecuencia se considera que no están haciendo el trabajo de la clase y no podrán demostrar dominio del material (incluso si hacen la tarea).